Sharon Gaudin

About the Author Sharon Gaudin


Industrial robots are security weak link

Industrial robots used in factories and warehouses that are connected to the internet are not secure, leaving companies open to cyberattacks and costly damages.

That’s the word coming from a study conducted by global security software company Trend Micro and Polytechnic University of Milan, the largest technical university in Italy.

“The industrial robot – it’s not ready for the world it’s living in,” said Mark Nunnikhoven, vice president of cloud research at Trend Micro. “The reality is these things are being connected in more and more places. There are a lot of attacks that could happen in that environment.”

The study looked at Internet security vulnerabilities that could involve industrial robots used on manufacturing lines in areas such as the automobile and aerospace industries. The robots, which generally look like large mechanical arms, are used to move heavy objects, weld seams and fit pieces together. The machines also can be found moving and stacking crates in warehouses.

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Should your next big hire be a chief A.I. officer?

As companies increasingly turn to artificial intelligence to communicate with customers, make sense of big data and find answers to vexing questions, some say it’s time to think about hiring a chief A.I. officer.

A chief artificial intelligence Officer – or CAIO — could round out your C-level execs, sitting at the big table with your CIO, CFO, CTO and CEO.

“A.I. is going to be really important to some companies – enough to have top officers who will focus on just that,” said Steve Chien, head of the artificial intelligence group for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. “And beyond that, you’ll want every employee thinking about how A.I. can improve what they do and you’ll want a chief A.I. officer overseeing all of that. They should be constantly thinking about how A.I. can improve things.”

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Amazon commits to hiring 100,000 U.S. workers

Over the next 18 months, Amazon expects to add 100,000 full-time jobs in the U.S.

While many of the jobs will be in warehouses, Amazon said the company will be looking for engineers and software developers in such areas as cloud computing and machine learning.

“Innovation is one of our guiding principles at Amazon, and it’s created hundreds of thousands of American jobs,” said Jeff Bezos, Amazon founder and CEO, in a statement. “These jobs are not just in our Seattle headquarters or in Silicon Valley. They’re in our customer service network, fulfillment centers and other facilities in local communities throughout the country.”

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Families of ISIS victims sue Twitter for being ‘weapon for terrorism’

The families of three Americans killed in ISIS terror attacks are suing Twitter for allegedly knowingly providing support for the terrorist group and acting as a “powerful weapon for terrorism.”

The suit was filed over the weekend in a federal court in New York City on behalf of the relatives of three U.S. nationals who were killed by ISIS in the March 22, 2016, terrorist attacks in Brussels and the Nov. 13, 2015, terrorist attacks in Paris. At least 32 people died in the Brussels attack and about 130 in the attack in Paris.

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Are strain, stress at Twitter driving out top execs?

With Twitter struggling to fuel its user and financial growth, the strain may be showing as several top executives head out the door.

Twitter Chief Operating Officer Adam Bain left the company last month, and on Tuesday,  Adam Messinger, the company’s chief technology officer, and Josh McFarland, vice president of product, announced that they too are leaving the social network.

Messinger, who joined Twitter five years ago, tweeted on Tuesday, “After 5 years I’ve decided to leave Twitter and take some time off. Grateful to @jack for the opportunity and to my team for shipping.”

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AWS looks to take the drudge work out of data analysis

Amazon Web Services is looking to make it easier, and more efficient, for enterprises to analyze their data in the cloud.

“Eighty percent of what we call analytics is not analytics at all but just hard work,” said Werner Vogels, chief technology officer at Amazon.com, speaking during a keynote speech this morning at the AWS re:Invent cloud conference in Las Vegas.

Instead of digging down into a company’s data to find patterns and insights that will give an enterprise a competitive advantage, too much time is spent on indexing, storage, security, and making sure the right access is set up.

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