A ray of hope in the fight against malvertising

I recently wrote about how the Angler malware threat had affected my company. Adversaries have been buying space on legitimate advertising banner services, embedding malware in their fake ads, and using the unsuspecting ad agencies to serve their malware through legitimate websites to users, who might be innocently browsing major news and financial websites. It continues to be a problem for me.

Today, for example, I got an alert about an infection attempt via a training website. I’m also seeing an increasing number of Angler infection attempts coming via Web searches. The malware-bearing search results all look the same: seemingly random text from some old book, probably some classic of literature, that doesn’t make any sense in the context of the Web search. That doesn’t matter, though; it’s just there to serve up malware to any unsuspecting users who click on the search result. One of my users was hit yesterday while trying to find a hiking website in India.

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One-step printing process provides cost-efficient transparent, conductive and patterned coatings for flexible touchscreens

Mobile phones and smart phones still haven‘t been adapted to the carrying habits of their users. That much is clear to anyone who has tried sitting down with a mobile phone in their back pocket: the displays of the innumerable phones and pods are rigid and do not yield to the anatomical forms adopted by the people carrying them. By now it is no longer any secret that the big players in the industry are working on flexible displays.

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US court bans the sale of some Samsung phones at Apple’s request

A federal court in California has banned the sale in the U.S. of Samsung smartphones that have features that infringe three patents owned by Apple.

On Monday, Judge Lucy Koh of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, ruled that the permanent injunction would come into effect 30 days after the entry of the order. The ban covers the implementation of features like the “slide-to-unlock” and auto word correction capabilities in some of Samsung’s earlier phones.

The smartphones covered under the order include Samsung’s Admire, Galaxy Nexus, Galaxy Note, Galaxy Note II, Galaxy S II, Galaxy S II Epic 4G Touch, Galaxy S II Skyrocket, Galaxy S III, and Stratosphere products, which are Samsung’s older smartphones.

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