Google Keep is probably the best Google service that most people don’t use.

Services like Keep, Evernote and Microsoft OneNote are often called “note-taking apps.” But it’s an obsolete label. They’ve grown beyond their roots, now offering collaborative workflow, reminders, checklists, geofencing, optical character recognition, voice transcription, sketching and more.

A few years ago, I would have recommended Evernote. But over the summer, Evernote took a wrong turn. The company changed its pricing structure in a way that practically forces users to pay or quit. Specifically, Evernote added limitations to the free version, called Evernote Basic. It’s now accessible via a maximum of two devices per year — a total deal-killer, as far as I’m concerned. They limit uploads to 60 megabytes per month, which is absurdly low. And they raised prices on premium tiers. The paid versions of Evernote now cost $34.99, $69.99 and $120 per year.

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